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2012-09-27

PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's Curiosity rover mission has found evidence a stream once ran vigorously across the area on Mars where the rover is driving. There is earlier evidence for the presence of water on Mars, but this evidence -- images of rocks containing ancient streambed gravels -- is the first of its kind.

Scientists are studying the images of stones cemented into a layer of conglomerate rock. The sizes and shapes of stones offer clues to the speed and distance of...


 
2012-09-26
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On Sol 50 (Sept. 26), Curiosity completed its longest drive yet, rolling about 160 feet (48.9 meters) eastward toward the Glenelg area. The mission's total distance driven has now reached one-quarter mile (416 meters). A priority in coming sols is to identify a location for first use of the rover's capability to scoop up soil material and deliver a sample of it into laboratory instruments.

Activities on Sol 50 included pre-drive imaging of a target near the morning...


 
2012-09-26
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PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA will host a news conference at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT) Thursday, Sept. 27, to present science findings from the Curiosity rover's mission to Mars' Gale Crater. The news conference from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., will be carried live on NASA Television, the agency's website and on Ustream.

Curiosity, also known as the Mars Science Laboratory, is 50 days into a two-year mission to investigate whether conditions may...


 
2012-09-25
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On Sol 49 (Sept. 25), Curiosity drove about 102 feet (31 meters), bringing the mission's total amount of driving to about 1,204 feet (367 meters). The rover science team's current focus is on getting Curiosity to the Glenelg area, and the drive took the rover eastward toward that destination.

Activities on Sol 49 before the drive included observation of a wheel track. After the drive, cameras on the mast observed the sky, as well as terrain at the rover's new location. A...


 
2012-09-24
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PASADENA, Calif. -- NASA's rover Curiosity touched a Martian rock with its robotic arm for the first time on Sept. 22, assessing what chemical elements are in the rock called "Jake Matijevic."

After a short drive the preceding day to get within arm's reach of the football-size rock, Curiosity put its Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument in contact with the rock during the rover's 46th Martian day, or sol. The APXS is on a turret at the end of the rover's...


 

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